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MOTORS FOR EXTREME RC SURFACE ACTION

RC DRAG RACING MOTORS

NEURACING 15xx SPEED RUN & DRAG RACING MOTORS

Are you looking for blistering performance for your 1/10th, or for your Limitless, Felony or Infraction? NeuRacing’s RC DRAG RACING MOTORS are your ticket to extreme speed!

1/7th DRAG AND SPEED RUN SETUP GUIDE

MOTOR

Very good 6S setup. Hot 8S setup.
Recommended baseline 8S setup. Best for unprepped.
Recommended baseline 8S setup. Better on prepped.
90% as fast as the hottest setups. Not picky on gearing.
Hot 6S setup, pulls tons of amps. Too hot for 8S.

PREPPED

8S

SPUR GEAR

42

PINION

20
22
24
26
X
44
21
23
25
27
X
46
22
24
26
29
X
6S
40
25
28
X
X
22
42
27
29
X
X
23
44
28
31
X
X
24

UNPREPPED

8S

SPUR GEAR

42

PINION

22
24
26
29
X
44
23
25
28
30
X
46
24
27
29
31
X
6S
40
28
31
X
X
24
42
29
32
35
38
25
44
31
34
37
40
27

Green setups are recommended.  Yellow X setups are not recommended.

WHICH IS THE FASTEST?

They all are! – In RC drag racing, the motor is only one part of a system. The motor converts power from a battery to torque at the wheels which then moves the mass of your car forward.  Other factors include: optimized gearing, wires, connectors, battery C capability,  battery temperature, tires, vehicle weight,  front-to back weight distribution and traction.

Check out how we name our RC drag racing motors – It’s just a numbering system, the same as we name our motors for healthcare, aerospace, cool electric surfboards, and many other applications – not fancy marketing hype.  Understand this and you can easily compare the motors and make the best choice for YOUR setup!

NEURACING MOTOR NAMING SYSTEM -- This is worth reading!

Here’s how we name our motors – It’s just a numbering system, not fancy marketing hype.  Use this to compare the motors.

Let’s use the 1530/.75D (2640 KV) as our example.  1530/.75D (2640 KV) should be read as 15 | 30 | .75 | D which runs at 2,640 RPMS per volt.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

Let’s talk about the last part of the code – the Kv. Kv is the voltage constant.* It represents the number of RPMs the motor will spin for each volt applied to the motor by the speed control.  A 1,000 KV motor should spin at 10,000 RPMs when 10 volts are applied. A 2,000 KV motor spins at twice the speed of a 1,000KV motor with the same voltage.  But this is at NO LOAD.  A small 2,000 KV motor may not put out anywhere near the power of a large 1,000 KV motor.  You can adjust the connection between the motor and your wheels by varying your gearing ratio to make a low KV motor spin your wheels faster than a high kv motor.

Pro Tip: The KV of a motor is determined by the number of turns of wire around the stator teeth, the length of the motor and the type of wire termination inside the motor.

*Kv in this context does not mean kilovolt. That’s written as kV and you’ll know it when you see it.  We aren’t working with kilovolts here!!


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The first two digits are the motor’s internal diameter in inches. 15 = 1.5″ inches – so all 15 series are the same diameter.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The second two digits are the motor’s internal length. 30 is 3.0 inches – so a 1530 is 3 inches long inside and a 1539 is 3.9 inches long inside the case. Longer motors have more power capability and more weight.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The 3rd set of digits is the number of times the internal wires are wrapped around the stator teeth. You may be familiar with the old brushed motor term of “turns.” More turns means lower Kv. So 1530/.75D has .75 wraps of the wire inside the motor around the steel teeth of the stator.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The final letter refers to the internal connection of the 3 motor wires. D = Delta, the Greek letter for D that looks like a triangle. The other option is Y, and the Y wind looks like a letter Y inside.  A Delta motor will spin 1.8 times the kv of a Y motor with the same number of turns.  Change the turns in a Y motor and it will spin just as fast as a Delta with nearly identical performance.

NOTE: This system applies to the NEUMOTORS INRUNNERS.  OUTRUNNERS are the same format, but they are in metric units (MM).

 

WHICH IS BETTER, DELTA OR Y?

For RC purposes, there is no difference, ZERO, nothing, NADA, better about a D than a Y. We use D and Y winds interchangeably to adjust the KV of the motor. Sometimes the D offers the KV we need, sometimes the Y offers the KV that we need.

WILL TIMING ADVANCE MAKE ME KING OF THE STRIP?

“But what about timing advance?” you ask.  Timing advance in your ESC settings can slightly increase the KV of a Y wind motor.  This only works with Y wind motors, and it is only a 2 to 3%  increase in RPM. This comes at a dramatic increase in heat inside the motor.  Timing advance is the last option behind proper choice of Kv, optimizing gearing, wiring, connectors, battery C capability*,  battery temperature, tires, overall weight, front-to-back weight distribution and track surface.

“But what about timing advance on a D wind motor?”  Don’t do it.  Just leave the ESC in auto mode.  Timing makes no performance improvement in the system.  Changing timing for a D wind motor will negatively affect performance.

If you want a higher KV motor, just order a higher KV motor. Timing advance is only for Y wind and even then it is only a patch.

 

* Choose batteries carefully.  C rating is often misrepresented.  C rating is an indicator of how well the battery can deliver volts under the massive amp loads of these vehicles.  A sag of a volt or two reduces motor speed (KV times VOLTAGE) dramatically.

OK, SO WHICH IS FASTEST?

1539/ .75D (2031kv)  is the largest of the motors and will deliver the most power on 8S depending on gearing.  It is heavier and may take more power to simply spin up the rotor.

1539/.5D (3046 KV) is the hottest KV in the largest motor for use with 6S only.

Remember, the other motors in the list may be faster depending on your vehicle setup!

1530 / .75D (2640 kv) RACING MOTOR

Very good 6S setup.  Hot 8S setup.

Motor is 4.3″ long.

Motor is good for 5,500+ watts.

$419.00

9 in stock

1533 / .75D (2400 kv) RACING MOTOR

Baseline 8S setup for unprepped surfaces.

Motor is 5.2″ long.

Motor is good for 6,000+ watts.

$469.00

9 in stock

1536 / .75D (2200 kv) RACING MOTOR

Baseline 8S setup for prepped surfaces.

Motor is 5.2″ long.

Motor is good for 6,500+ watts.

$479.00

10 in stock

1539 / .75D (2031 kv) DRAG RACING MOTOR

90% as fast as the hottest setups but not picky on gearing.

Motor is 5.2″ long. 

Motor is good for 7,000++ watts.

$489.00

9 in stock

1539 / .5D (3046 kv) RACING MOTOR

Hot 6S setup. Pulls tons of amps. 

Too hot for 8S!

Motor is 5.2″ long. 

Motor is good for 7,000++ watts.

$489.00

9 in stock

1/10th SCALE RACING MOTORS

1415 / .75D (xxxx kv) RACING MOTOR for 1/10th SCALE

36.5mm diameter for rules-based racing where a 36mm motor can is required.

Motor is 2.7″  70.2mm long.

5mm shaft

If rules are not an issue, we strongly recommend the 1515 .7D as an extreme power system for 1/10 racing. The slightly larger diameter allows for more powerful stator and windings to be used.

$299.00

10 in stock

1515 / .75D (5280 kv) RACING MOTOR for 1/10th SCALE

For 4S and 5S +  setups. Pulls tons of amps.

Motor is 2.7″ long.

$325.00

10 in stock

1521 / 1D (2829 kv) RACING MOTOR for 1/10th SCALE

$362.00

10 in stock

MOTORS FOR EXTREME RC SURFACE ACTION

RC DRAG RACING & SPEED RUN MOTORS

NEURACING’s 15xx SERIES FOR SPEED RUNS AND DRAG RACING

Are you looking for blistering performance for your 1/10th Scale or your Limitless, Felony or Infraction? NeuRacing’s RC DRAG RACING MOTORS are your ticket to extreme speed!

1/7th DRAG & SPEED RUN SETUP GUIDE

Green setups are recommended.  Yellow X setups are not recommended.

WHICH IS THE FASTEST?

They all are! – In RC drag racing, the motor is only one part of a system. The motor converts power from a battery to torque at the wheels which then moves the mass of your car forward.  Other factors include: optimized gearing, wires, connectors, battery C capability,  battery temperature, tires, vehicle weight,  front-to back weight distribution and traction.

Check out how we name our RC drag racing motors – It’s just a numbering system, the same as we name our motors for healthcare, aerospace, cool electric surfboards, and many other applications – not fancy marketing hype.  Understand this and you can easily compare the motors and make the best choice for YOUR setup!

NEURACING MOTOR NAMING SYSTEM -- This is worth reading!

Here’s how we name our motors – It’s just a numbering system, not fancy marketing hype.  Use this to compare the motors.

Let’s use the 1530/.75D (2640 KV) as our example.  1530/.75D (2640 KV) should be read as 15 | 30 | .75 | D which runs at 2,640 RPMS per volt.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

Let’s talk about the last part of the code – the Kv. Kv is the voltage constant.* It represents the number of RPMs the motor will spin for each volt applied to the motor by the speed control.  A 1,000 KV motor should spin at 10,000 RPMs when 10 volts are applied. A 2,000 KV motor spins at twice the speed of a 1,000KV motor with the same voltage.  But this is at NO LOAD.  A small 2,000 KV motor may not put out anywhere near the power of a large 1,000 KV motor.  You can adjust the connection between the motor and your wheels by varying your gearing ratio to make a low KV motor spin your wheels faster than a high kv motor.

Pro Tip: The KV of a motor is determined by the number of turns of wire around the stator teeth, the length of the motor and the type of wire termination inside the motor.

*Kv in this context does not mean kilovolt. That’s written as kV and you’ll know it when you see it.  We aren’t working with kilovolts here!!


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The first two digits are the motor’s internal diameter in inches. 15 = 1.5″ inches – so all 15 series are the same diameter.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The second two digits are the motor’s internal length. 30 is 3.0 inches – so a 1530 is 3 inches long inside and a 1539 is 3.9 inches long inside the case. Longer motors have more power capability and more weight.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The 3rd set of digits is the number of times the internal wires are wrapped around the stator teeth. You may be familiar with the old brushed motor term of “turns.” More turns means lower Kv. So 1530/.75D has .75 wraps of the wire inside the motor around the steel teeth of the stator.


1530/.75D (2640 KV)

The final letter refers to the internal connection of the 3 motor wires. D = Delta, the Greek letter for D that looks like a triangle. The other option is Y, and the Y wind looks like a letter Y inside.  A Delta motor will spin 1.8 times the kv of a Y motor with the same number of turns.  Change the turns in a Y motor and it will spin just as fast as a Delta with nearly identical performance.

NOTE: This system applies to the NEUMOTORS INRUNNERS.  OUTRUNNERS are the same format, but they are in metric units (MM).

 

WHICH IS BETTER, DELTA OR Y?

For RC purposes, there is no difference, ZERO, nothing, NADA, better about a D than a Y. We use D and Y winds interchangeably to adjust the KV of the motor. Sometimes the D offers the KV we need, sometimes the Y offers the KV that we need.

WILL TIMING ADVANCE MAKE ME KING OF THE STRIP?

“But what about timing advance?” you ask.  Timing advance in your ESC settings can slightly increase the KV of a Y wind motor.  This only works with Y wind motors, and it is only a 2 to 3%  increase in RPM. This comes at a dramatic increase in heat inside the motor.  Timing advance is the last option behind proper choice of Kv, optimizing gearing, wiring, connectors, battery C capability*,  battery temperature, tires, overall weight, front-to-back weight distribution and track surface.

“But what about timing advance on a D wind motor?”  Don’t do it.  Just leave the ESC in auto mode.  Timing makes no performance improvement in the system.  Changing timing for a D wind motor will negatively affect performance.

If you want a higher KV motor, just order a higher KV motor. Timing advance is only for Y wind and even then it is only a patch.

 

* Choose batteries carefully.  C rating is often misrepresented.  C rating is an indicator of how well the battery can deliver volts under the massive amp loads of these vehicles.  A sag of a volt or two reduces motor speed (KV times VOLTAGE) dramatically.

OK, SO WHICH IS FASTEST?

1539/ .75D (2031kv)  is the largest of the motors and will deliver the most power on 8S depending on gearing.  It is heavier and may take more power to simply spin up the rotor.

1539/.5D (3046 KV) is the hottest KV in the largest motor for use with 6S only.

Remember, the other motors in the list may be faster depending on your vehicle setup!

GEARING CHART

TAP IMAGE FOR BEST VIEW ON PHONE

GREEN BOXES ARE BEST OPTIONS

YELLOW BOXES ARE NOT RECOMMENDED

1530 / .75D (2640 kv)

Very good 6S setup.  Hot 8S setup.

Motor is 4.3″ long.

Motor is good for 5,500+ watts.

$419.00

9 in stock

1533 / .75D (2400 kv)

Baseline 8S setup for unprepped surfaces.

Motor is 5.2″ long.

Motor is good for 6,000+ watts.

$469.00

9 in stock

1536 / .75D (2200 kv)

Baseline 8S setup for prepped surfaces.

Motor is 5.2″ long.

Motor is good for 6,500+ watts. 

$479.00

10 in stock

1539 / .5D (3046 kv)

Hot 6S setup. Pulls tons of amps. 

Too hot for 8S!

Motor is 5.2″ long. 

Motor is good for 7,000++ watts. 

$489.00

9 in stock

1539 / .75D (2031 kv)

90% as fast as the hottest setups but not picky on gearing.

Motor is 5.2″ long. 

Motor is good for 7,000++ watts. 

$489.00

9 in stock

1/10th SCALE RACING MOTORS

1415/ .75D (xxxx kv)

36.5mm diameter for rules-based racing where a 36mm motor can is required.

Motor is 2.7″  70.2mm long.

5mm shaft

For 4S.  Many users report success with 5S and 6S too. 

If rules are not an issue, we strongly recommend the 1515 .75D as an extreme power system for 1/10 racing. The slightly larger diameter allows for more powerful stator and windings to be used.

$299.00

10 in stock

1515/ .75D (5280 kv)

Best bet for 1/10th vehicles on 4S, 5S, – 6S if you are up for it.

5mm shaft.

5280 KV

10 in stock

1521/ 1D (2829 kv)

$362.00

10 in stock